How to do a blind drawing

The Sparkle Experiment Blind Contour Drawing
Created using a 1/2 blind drawing approach

Sometimes when getting creative, we get caught up in judging our art before we’ve even finished making it. Focused on wanting to make something ‘good,’ we limit our potential by having such a low tolerance for ‘mistakes’. There is so much potential in making strange and weird marks, allowing for spontaneity and happy accidents, that making bad art is a way to get better a making good art. Sam Anderson suggests blind drawing is “the fastest way to break them out of old bad habits, to make them unlearn lifeless conventions.” As well as being “Joyful and meditative…you can do it anywhere, anytime, with any subject. It will flip you, like a switch, from absence to presence.” It’s a kind of active meditation where you let go of the outcome and get very still while drawing.

You will need: paper and a pencil or pen. Optional board or book to fix the paper to, if you find the paper keeps slipping.

  1. Fix your gaze on your chosen subject and without looking at your paper, slowly draw what you see
  2. Take your time to finish your drawing without looking at your paper

Kimon Nicolaides reminds us that “a contour study is not a thing that can be ‘finished.’ It is having a particular type of experience, which can continue as long as you have the patience to look.”

The Sparkle Experiment Blind Contour Drawing

A couple of variations you can try:

  • close your eyes and draw from your imagination
  • set a timer and draw until it goes off
  • Place the paper within your peripheral vision so that it’s still fuzzy but you can see where your pen is in relation to the paper. This creates a sort of 1/2 blind drawing, allowing more control
  • Use your non-dominant hand to draw and either choose to look at what you’re drawing, or not. Be prepared for some fun mark making!

Your first attempt is likely to make you laugh because it will be so strange and bad but that’s exactly the point. Art should be about having fun and letting go. Blind drawing is a wonderful exercise in letting go, embracing bad art and getting clumsy like Piasso. But with practice comes improvement, more speed and confident according to Felix Scheinberger.  “As strange as it may seem, blind contour drawing will teach you to observe more closely and to draw more confidently.”

“Lately I’ve been experimenting a lot with “un-perfecting” as a way to loosen up, embrace the grit, and explore new kinds of energy in my paintings. While a highly refined painting can certainly be lovely, I find raw, messy, human expression and experience to be incredibly compelling – and refreshing… One way to achieve this kind of less controlled look is to explore using your nondominant hand.”Flora Bowley, Creative Revolution.